Traditional Italian hairstyles

Traditional Italian hairstyles

When referring to a traditional Italian hairstyle, it is pretty hard to think of a particular one. The representation of national traditions has changed drastically over time. Look back at Renaissance loose hairstyles with a defined hairline, the Baroque drawn back heavy braids, held by golden jewelry-embroidered headband, — these are impossible to associate with playful short puddle cuts, that the glamorous Italian actresses stunned the world with in the middle of the 20th century. Italy is generally associated with traditions, but, indeed, they do change. To understand the concept of traditional Italian hairstyles better, hop on a timespan and travel back to the rise of artistic era in 16th century, slowly making the way up to present day, where some elements are new, some are borrowed, and some have never gone out of style.

A single glimpse at the Renaissance exposition in any art museum gives a complete picture of sophisticated, yet natural, ways Italian woman used to decorate their hair. Bonnets embroidered with pearls and sapphires and golden headbands really stand out on the paintings by some renowned artists of the era, like Sobanisba Anguissola, who painted herself and her sisters. Her portraits draw introduction to a traditional «Rinascimento» feminine hairstyle, with the section of hair rolled back from the hairline and divided by ribbons. Looks familiar to styles that present-day hairstylists offer to bridesmaids or a bride herself. A thick hair fringe used to divide the accurate hairline form the rest of the voluminous hairstyle also remains a very popular element up-to-date, when thinking about wedding hair design. The only thing troubling modern women’s understanding is how women back in the era curled their hair without an iron. But methods change, so do the hairstyles.

Let’s take a long jump from Renaissance up to the roaring 20’s, when the whole world stepped out of the previously believed standards of beauty and style. Seems like women just began cutting everything they had: dresses barely reached the knee-length, and the hair obtained a significant bob shape, which, to the point, reappeared the 50’s dolce-vita, when the major Italian Cut gained recognition. The stars of Italian movies began sporting short, shaggy haircuts that looked messy, but undeniably chic and interesting. In her appearance in Beat the Devil, Gina Lollobrigida stroke with her Elfin like Italian cut hairstyle. In these years, a beloved Roman Holiday movie was also released, and the whole world saw how Audrey Hepburn freely cropped her long hair to a short pixie cut. It was sure to create waves of excitement – especially amongst brunettes. As the decade progressed, Italian cuts blended with other styles like the bouffant to create more volume and a rounder shape, and the sides also slimmed.

A goal to outline the form of the face tends to be unchanged over the centuries, however, different hairstyles appear and degrade to fulfill this task. Italian women, sophisticated and sharp by nature, love to experiment with new styles, both in fashion, and beauty. But one thing is surely enough can never be doubled — they will never step out of home without their hair done. Whether the hairstyle is pointed towards messy, or accurate, Italian women can make it traditional and desired.